The Official Journal of EuroPCR and the European Association of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (EAPCI)

The impact on radial injury of sheathless versus conventional access for transradial interventions: a randomized trial

DOI: 10.4244/EIJ-D-19-00380

1. Department of Cardiology, Haaglanden Medical Center, The Hague, the Netherlands, Netherlands
2. Department of Cardiology, Isala Heart Center, Zwolle, the Netherlands
3. Department of Cardiology, Tergooi Hospital, Blaricum, the Netherlands
4. Department of Cardiology, Tergooi Hospital, Blaricum, the Netherlands
5. Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
6. Department of Health Evidence, section Biostatistics, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences Radboud University Medical center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
7. Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
8. Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Disclaimer:

As a public service to our readership, this article - peer reviewed by the Editors of EuroIntervention - has been published immediately upon acceptance as it was received. The content of this article is the sole responsibility of the authors, and not that of the journal or its publishers.

To read the full content of this article, please log in to download the PDF.

Recent studies reported a high rate of transradial access (TRA) induced vascular injury which leads to chronic intimal thickening and is associated with radial artery spasm (RAS) and radial artery occlusion (RAO)1–3. It is likely to be caused by radial artery puncture, sheath introduction and sheath friction caused by radial artery inner diameter-sheath outer diameter (RAID/SOD) mismatch. However, using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), post procedural radial artery (RA) damage was also found in the proximal part of the RA, where the vessel has a larger diameter and radial artery internal diameter/sheath outer diameter (RAID/SOD) mismatch is less likely to be the cause of vascular damage. One of the possible mechanisms is intimal damage caused by the space between the guidewire and the,catheter tip which shaves the vessel wall (“razor” effect, figure 1) 4.

Sign in to read and download the full article

Forgot your password?
No account yet? Sign up for free!
Create my pcr account

Join us for free and access thousands of articles from EuroIntervention, as well as presentations, videos, cases from PCRonline.com

Read next article

The Obesity Paradox Revisited: Body Mass Index and Long-Term Outcomes After PCI From a Large Pooled Patient-Level Database